Latest Conferences

We are proud to showcase our research at premier national and international conferences. Below you can find a selection of our upcoming conference presentations. For a full list of conference presentations, click here.

Enjoy the read! 

 
 

Paper presentation: managing employee perceptions of job demands and burnout in times of ORGANIzATIONAL change.

Nikolova, I., Griep, Y., & De Jong, S. (2017, August). 

 

This study sheds light on an area which is challenging for many leaders, namely how to positively affect employees during organizational change implementatzion. More specifically, we argue that the tactics leaders use to communicate about the change implementation can influence the way employees experience job demands (i.e. work pressure, role ambiguity, and job complexity) as either challenging or hindering, and that these demands subsequently affect employee burnout and perceptions of organizational support. Moreover, we expect that the quality of the leader-member interaction (LMX) acts as a first stage moderator in the above described mediation model because social resources such as LMX can help employees to deal better with demanding situations. To test these assumptions, we surveyed 963 employees and 123 supervisors working in a governmental agency at two time points. We found evidence for the suggested moderated mediation processes. However, against our expectations, using pressure when communicating about the change implementation did not relate directly to burnout, but was related through increased job demands. This indicates that job demands may play a key role in the development of employee strain. Importantly, the results revealed that, in combination with low LMX, leader’s use of rational persuasion can reduce perceived job complexity among employees, while high LMX would enhance these perceptions. 

 

Paper to be presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

 

Symposium organizer: Capturing the real employee-employer relationship: Incorporating time and emphasizing application in the study of psychological contracts

Hansen, S. D., Griep, Y., Vantilborgh, T., & Jones, S. K. (2017, August). 

 

For decades, researchers have shown that the psychological contract (PC) construct—i.e., employees’ beliefs about their own and their organizations’ obligations to one another—offers a powerful lens to understand employee attitudes and behaviors such as counterproductive work behavior, performance, commitment, and turnover intentions. Meta-analytic evidence (Zhao, Wayne, Glibkowski, & Bravo, 2007) indicates that employees respond favorably when they believe that the organization is fulfilling its obligations to them (i.e., employees continue to meet their obligations to the organization). However, when employees believe that the organization has fallen short on fulfilling its obligations (i.e., employees perceive a PC breach), negative affective, attitudinal, and behavioral reactions erupt. Increasingly, trends such as organizational restructuring, downsizing, reliance on temporary workers, the emergence of new ‘types’ of workers, and increases in demographic diversity mean that organizations are not always able or willing to fulfill their obligations to employees. As such, PC breach perceptions are on the rise.

            The bulk of research in the extant literature has studied PCs from a between-person perspective, focusing heavily on PC evaluation (i.e., breach and fulfillment). Despite the utility of these findings, we still know little about the contextual factors that account for important differences in PC processes that are critical to organizational success (see Johns, 2006). For instance, we know little about the circumstances under which people will perceive a PC breach, the temporal nature of breach perceptions (e.g., immediate or delayed), or the dynamic nature of breach reactions over time. Thus, our understanding of how PCs can be applied in practice (e.g., timely organizational interventions, appropriate supervisor responses) remains limited.

            One crucial contextual factor in the study of PCs is time. For this reason, scholars have begun to urge researchers to recognize PC dynamism by focusing on within-person processes (Conway & Briner, 2002; Griep, Vantilborgh, Baillien, & Pepermans, 2016; Vantilborgh, Bidee, Pepermans, Griep, & Hofmans, 2016). This perspective emphasizes, for example, how the PC forms and changes over time, or how reactions to PC evaluations unfold over time. As a result, it allows for more fine-grained answers to the fundamental questions of why, when, and how PCs shape employee attitudes and behaviors. With this symposium, we aimed to pull together a collection of papers that offers a more in-depth perspective on PCs that better reflects the ups and downs of the real employment relationship. We sought out papers that acknowledged the important role of time in PC processes and that recognized the need to understand the practical aspects of PC processes (e.g., unique beliefs and needs of emerging types of employees). We will have presentations by Hansen, S. D. on "Capturing real employee-employer relationships through time: A framework for integrating time into the study of PCs", Garg, S. on "Boomerang employees and the new experience of an old employment relationship: The role of PC comparisons", Jones, S. K. on "I can only work so hard: Exploring ideological contract breaches and work effort in health care employees" Erdem, C. on "Pre-entry time: A grounded investigation of the pre-entry expectations that contribute to formation of Millennial employees’ anticipatory PCs", and Demonic, M., & Jepsen, D. on "PC fulfillment over time and employee wellbeing". 

        

Symposium to be presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

 

Paper presentation: Keepers of the past: meaningful work through historical sensemaking.

Jones, S. K., Foster, W. M., Coraiola, D. M., & Suddaby, R. (2017, June). 

 

The meaning of work literature has extensively explored how employees finding meaning in work and meaning at work. However, scholars have failed to consider the relation between the two. The present study proposes the construct of meaning work to explain how corporate archivists engage in passive and covert storytelling to bring together meaning in work and meaning at work. A Grounded Theory approach guided analysis of 32 semi-structured interviews, indicating that archivists found meaning in work, the organization provided meaning at work, and that storytelling acted as a mechanism for the development of meaningful work. These findings expand our understanding of meaningful work for employees and the role that corporate archivists play in shaping corporate historical narratives.

 

Paper to be presented at the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada Conference, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

 

Paper presentation: One big happy engineering family? The influence of psychological contracts on team outcomes and the mediating role of person-team fit.

Gibbard, K., Griep, Y., Hoffart, G., & Onen, D. (2017, June). 

 

Teamwork is frequently used to tackle complex and demanding tasks in organizational and educational settings. While teamwork may offer substantial benefits, the challenges of working effectively in teams are considerable. It is within this challenge that we propose the need to study team members’ perceptions of team fit (person-team fit). Person-team fit emerges when one compares him/herself to his/her team members on values, goals, and personality. Traditionally, higher levels of person-team fit are associated with positive work outcomes such as performance and satisfaction. However, when team members are perceived to disrupt the perceived mutual agreements within a team (psychological contract breach or PCB), this may lead to a wide range of negative attitudinal and behavioral consequences including reduced perceptions of person-team fit. As a consequence, team performance may be reduced.

In the current study we argue that previous studies have overlooked some fundamental aspects when studying the relationship between PCB and person team-fit. Specifically, we build on recent work by to differentiate complementary fit (i.e., the individual possesses characteristics that are unique within the team) from supplementary fit (i.e., the individual possesses characteristics that are similar to the team). Second, we draw on Optimal Distinctiveness Theory, to argue that individuals who perceive a PCB in their team will decrease their drive to be similar to their team (i.e., decreased supplementary fit), while increasing their drive to be distinct from their team (i.e., increased complementary fit). Third, we argue that perceptions of complementary fit bring different perspectives to the team by increasing the heterogeneity and as such holds the potential to increase the team’s potency (i.e., belief that a team can be effective), whereas perceptions of supplementary fit increase the homogeneity within a team (i.e., one big happy family feeling) and as such increases team member ratings of the team’s dynamics.

To investigate these propositions, we surveyed 12 Engineering student teams (N = 47) at three time points over the course of a semester. We analyzed our data using a longitudinal mediation model with autoregressive effects (i.e., controlling for change in the model) in Mplus. As expected we found that team perceptions of PCB at time 1 decreased supplementary fit at time 2, while increasing complementary fit at time 2. Moreover, we found that perceptions of supplementary fit at time 2 increased team member ratings of team dynamics at time 3. Finally, we found that perceptions of complementary fit at time 2 increased team potency at time 3. Additional regression analysis revealed that psychological safety was positively related to PCB; showing that when individuals feel comfortable to share their honest opinions they are more likely to admit that a PCB has occurred.

Our results suggest that teams should strive to foster a psychologically safe environment where team members feel comfortable to honestly evaluate the team’s psychological contract. Additionally, our findings show that while supplementary fit is beneficial for team dynamics, complementary fit is key to a team’s potency. 

 

Paper to be presented at the Canadian Engineering Education Association Annual Meeting, Toronto, ON.

 

workshop: One big happy engineering family? The influence of psychological contracts on team outcomes and the mediating role of person-team fit.

Hoffart, G. C, Gibbard, K., Griep, Y., O’Neill, T. A., & Grocutt, A. (2017, June). 

 

Engineering project teams are frequently utilized in education to develop teamwork skills required by accreditation bodies (e.g., Engineers Canada, 2015; ABET, 2016). However, teamwork is not without its challenges (i.e., team conflict), which can take valuable time away from instructors to mediate and manage intra-team issues. To overcome these issues, team contracts have been used as a means for creating a sense of responsibility and accountability in self-managing teams. Yet, little is known how contracts can be used to improve team dynamics and gain student buy-in. Hence, the workshop will build attendees’ knowledge and share best practices derived from recent findings at a large Canadian university. We will also present an empirically-derived team contract framework, which outlines six common areas of team dysfunction.  This framework can be adapted to any team-based project to improve team performance. Attendees will be engaged in an interactive session to experience first-hand how this contract framework can effectively be applied to any team-based curriculum. 

We will engage the attendees in an interactive session and break out activities for the purpose of solidifying their understanding of a team contract. They will experience how the contract can be adapted and applied in any team-based curriculum. Specifically, activities will include ad hoc teams completing one or more of the six sections of the contract (i.e., Expectations, Communication, Meetings, Conflict and Decisions, Stress Management, and Breaches and Penalties), which will be discussed in the overall group. Additionally, we will provide the participants with contract breach scenarios and a framework for talking about these contract breaches within teams. By doing so, we hope that attendees will experience the strengths and limitations of team contracts, and will leave with the basic knowledge and experience to utilize these team contracts in their own classrooms. 

 

Workshop to be presented at the Annual International Conference of Conceive Design Implement Operate, Calgary, AB.

 

Paper presentation: Justice trajectories in newcomers: How and why do overall justice perceptions develop, and does it matter? 

Eib, C., Griep, Y., Rupp, D., Trougakos, J., & Guo, J. (2017, June)

 

Teamwork is frequently used to tackle complex and demanding tasks in organizational and educational settings. While teamwork may offer substantial benefits, the challenges of working effectively in teams are considerable. It is within this challenge that we propose the need to study team members’ perceptions of team fit (person-team fit). Person-team fit emerges when one compares him/herself to his/her team members on values, goals, and personality. Traditionally, higher levels of person-team fit are associated with positive work outcomes such as performance and satisfaction. However, when team members are perceived to disrupt the perceived mutual agreements within a team (psychological contract breach or PCB), this may lead to a wide range of negative attitudinal and behavioral consequences including reduced perceptions of person-team fit. As a consequence, team performance may be reduced.

In the current study we argue that previous studies have overlooked some fundamental aspects when studying the relationship between PCB and person team-fit. Specifically, we build on recent work by to differentiate complementary fit (i.e., the individual possesses characteristics that are unique within the team) from supplementary fit (i.e., the individual possesses characteristics that are similar to the team). Second, we draw on Optimal Distinctiveness Theory, to argue that individuals who perceive a PCB in their team will decrease their drive to be similar to their team (i.e., decreased supplementary fit), while increasing their drive to be distinct from their team (i.e., increased complementary fit). Third, we argue that perceptions of complementary fit bring different perspectives to the team by increasing the heterogeneity and as such holds the potential to increase the team’s potency (i.e., belief that a team can be effective), whereas perceptions of supplementary fit increase the homogeneity within a team (i.e., one big happy family feeling) and as such increases team member ratings of the team’s dynamics.

To investigate these propositions, we surveyed 12 Engineering student teams (N = 47) at three time points over the course of a semester. We analyzed our data using a longitudinal mediation model with autoregressive effects (i.e., controlling for change in the model) in Mplus. As expected we found that team perceptions of PCB at time 1 decreased supplementary fit at time 2, while increasing complementary fit at time 2. Moreover, we found that perceptions of supplementary fit at time 2 increased team member ratings of team dynamics at time 3. Finally, we found that perceptions of complementary fit at time 2 increased team potency at time 3. Additional regression analysis revealed that psychological safety was positively related to PCB; showing that when individuals feel comfortable to share their honest opinions they are more likely to admit that a PCB has occurred.

Our results suggest that teams should strive to foster a psychologically safe environment where team members feel comfortable to honestly evaluate the team’s psychological contract. Additionally, our findings show that while supplementary fit is beneficial for team dynamics, complementary fit is key to a team’s potency. 

 

Paper to be presented at the Canadian Engineering Education Association Annual Meeting, Toronto, ON.

 

Symposium organizer: Beyond the immediate aftermath of psychological contract breach: The evolving nature of the psychological contract.

Griep, Y., Hansen, S. D. (2017, May). 

 

For nearly three decades the psychological contract (PC) has been a valuable tool in understanding and managing positive employee-employer relationships. Although a significant body of findings exists on the immediate negative attitudinal (e.g., reduced job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and behavioral (e.g., increased turnover and counterproductive work behavior) reactions (for meta-analyses see Zhao, Wayne, Glibkowski, & Bravo, 2007) to perceived PC breach and its associated violation feelings, little is known about the evolving nature of employee attitudes and behaviors in the days, weeks, months, and years following an initial breach perception. This is so because most existing research has failed to acknowledge the role of time in PC processes. 

Adopting a more time-sensitive perspective in the study of PCs will allow for greater understanding of the emergence of, and change in, the PC and its antecedents/consequences, the stability (or lack thereof) of PC breach reactions, and the rate of change (e.g., minutes, hours, days or weeks) and duration (e.g., immediate, delayed, or lingering) of these reactions.

The five presentations push the boundaries of PC literature by (1) furthering our knowledge of intra-phase processes (e.g., duration of violation reactions, how perceived obligations change over time), inter-phase transitions (e.g., how and when employees move from one phase in their PC to another), post-violation reactions, and emerging higher-order perceptions of breach, and (2) applying methods that are sensitive to these dynamic and context-oriented perspectives (e.g., mixed method design, experience sampling or longitudinal research).

We will have presentations by Conway, N., Kiefer, T., Briner, R., & Hartley, J. on "Trajectories of psychological contract breach following major organizational change and their effects on outcomes", Erdem, C. on "Pre-entry job expecations: A grounded investigation of the content dimensions that contribute to the formation of psychological contract", Vantilborgh, T., & Griep, Y. on "I knew this was coming! The dynamic interplay between anticipation and perception of psychological contract breaches", Klein, F. A., & Raeder, S. on "Development and dynamics of psychological contract and work engagement: A longitudinal study", and Akkermans, J., Bal, M. P., & de Jong, S. on "Your breach is my breach? A unit climate perspective on psychological contract breach".


Symposium to be presented at the 18th EAWOP Congress, Dublin, Ireland.

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Symposium organizer: